Wilsons Prom
AUSTRALIA,  WILSONS PROMONTORY

WILSONS PROMONTORY: WHAT TO DO?

Wilsons Promontory National Park is located on a peninsula that forms the southernmost tip of the Australian mainland. Have you been wondering what to do in Wilsons Promontory? It’s a walker paradise with a variety of tracks of different lengths and difficulty levels. It also stuns with sandy beaches, spectacular lookouts, rainforests and wildlife. In this blog post, I’m going to share with you some ideas what to do in Wilsons Promontory National Park and my personal suggestions on tracks I have walked.

WILSONS PROMONTORY: WHAT TO DO?

My answer is: EVERYTHING! Wilsons Promontory National Park is a perfect place for bushwalkers and outdoors enthusiasts. Nature in this area is absolutely stunning, pristine. Be sure to check what you need to know about Wilsons Promontory before going there. How many days is enough to stay? Where to stay overnight? I’m answering these questions in a separate blog post.

Central and southern sections of Wilsons Promontory National Park are considered well-marked and tourist friendly. I can bet that everyone will find something suitable and interesting to do here. There are low difficulty walking tracks, as well as more challenging ones. When it comes to accommodation in these sections, there are powered campgrounds with facilities such as bathrooms, toilets, and unpowered campsites with toilets only.

Northern part of Wilsons Promontory National Park is a remote wilderness zone with no facilities. Walking tracks are very difficult, scored as 5 under the Australian Walking Track Grading System. Some of them are unmarked and undefined. Therefore, this section of Wilsons Promontory is recommended for very experienced hikers only.

Map of Wilsons Promontory National Park
Wilsons Promontory National Park – map
BIG DRIFT

Big Drift is nothing else than a landscape of inland sand dunes. It is a short and well-marked walk that starts from the Stockyard. However, when you get there, it’s easy to get lost. The landscape of sand dunes changes almost every minute, so mark your path back to the walking track while enjoying the vast expanse of golden sands. Most probably, the footprints that you have left in the sand won’t be traceable.

Walking track: 4 km, 2 hours both ways

Big Drift is what you need to do in Wilsons Promontory
Big Drift is what you need to do in Wilsons Promontory
Big Drift is what you need to do in Wilsons Promontory
Big Drift
PROM WILDLIFE WALK

What else to do in Wilsons Promontory National Park? Well, viewing wildlife is one of the top things! It’s very likely that you will spot a kangaroo or two while driving through the national park, especially at dawn or dusk. However, if this is not enough for you, take the Prom Wildlife Walk. Who walks quietly, wins the game. I was lucky enough to see a kangaroo, wombat, blue tongue and emu.

Walking track: 2.3 km, 45 minutes both ways

Prom Wildlife Walk
Prom Wildlife Walk
Wombat Prom Wildlife Walk
Prom Wildlife Walk
SOUTHERN CIRCUIT

Do you like overnight hiking and camping under the stars? If yes, the Southern Circuit hike seems to be just perfect for you. It’s a 35 kilometre long trail through evergreen rainforest, beautiful seashore and sandy beaches with crystal clear water. It’s widely recommended to plan this hike over three days with two overnight stays at campsites. However, it depends on your fitness, hiking experience and preferences. I do think that this trail can be done within two days and not necessarily in a rush. Based on my own experience, it is even possible to do the Southern Circuit hike within one day. Yes, I did it within one day! But I don’t encourage you to do the same unless you are one hundred percent sure that you are able to hike for 12 hours and you don’t want to spend much time chilling out on the beach.

The Southern Circuit hike is a loop starting and finishing at Telegraph Saddle, where you can park your car. The trail includes three overnight campsites, which need to be booked in advance: Sealers Cove, Refuge Cove and Little Waterloo Bay. Please note that it’s required to get the campsite permit for overnight hiking at the Visitor Centre in Tidal River prior to commencing a hike. Further details on accommodation available in Wilsons Promontory National Park, overnight hiking and booking tips can be found in a separate blog post. Make sure to check what you need to know about Wilsons Promontory before going there.

Telegraph Saddle – Sealers Cove (campsite) – Refuge Cove (campsite) – Little Waterloo Bay (campsite) – Telegraph Saddle

Walking track: 35 km, around 12 hours

Southern Circuit hike is what you need to do in Wilsons Promontory
The rainforest between Telegraph Saddle and Sealers Cove
Southern Circuit hike is what you need to do in Wilsons Promontory
The track between Refuge Cove and Little Waterloo Bay
Southern Circuit hike is what you need to do in Wilsons Promontory
Waterloo Bay
Southern Circuit hike is what you need to do in Wilsons Promontory
The track between Little Waterloo Bay and Telegraph Saddle
THREE BAYS WALK

What to do next in Wilsons Promontory National Park? If you are a beach lover, this one will definitely suit your preferences! It is worth seeing the following beaches: Squeaky Beach, Picnic Bay and Whisky Bay. All of them are easily accessible by car. However, if you want to enjoy the beauty of land and sea at the same time, there is a walking track that starts at Tidal River and connects those three beaches.

Tidal River Squeaky Beach Picnic Bay Whisky Bay

Walking track: 12,4 km, 4 hours

Picnic Bay
Picnic Bay
Three Bays Walk
The track between Picnic Bay and Whisky Bay
Whisky Bay
Whisky Bay

What are you going to do in Wilsons Promontory National Park? Are you a bushwalker or do you prefer to chill out on the beach? Let me know by leaving a comment below!